Thursday, February 25, 2010

Hamantaschen

Hamantaschen are a traditional cookie that is eaten during the Jewish festival of Purim, which is coming up this weekend. They're sweet, triangular, and filled with jam or other fruity goodness.

Hamantaschen

My husband Andy has been making this recipe since he was little. It was sweet watching his eagerness to show me each little step of his mother's recipe, regressing back to the inner child version of himself. We officially decided that this was our 1st Annual Hamantaschen-Making Party (I wish I could call it Hamantaschenstravaganza or something fun like that, but it doesn't exactly roll off the tongue). I'm excited to make this a yearly tradition!

For more background on Purim and the symbolism of the triangular cookie, head over to my friend Julie's hamataschen post from last year, she summed it up nicely.

We used blueberry and apricot preserves, raspberry jam, and I experimented with nutella and a few that have chocolate and/or peanut butter chips. I'll always like the fruity ones best though. They're traditional, and I think they taste better with the cookie part too.

Does your family have a favorite holiday cookie recipe?

Hamantaschen
Makes about 2 dozen
Printable Recipe

Dough:

2 large eggs
1/2 c. sugar
1/2 c. vegetable oil
1 tsp. vanilla extract
Juice & grated rind of 1/2 an orange
2 1/2 c. all-purpose flour
2 tsp. baking powder
1/4 tsp. salt

Filling:
Jam, preserves, or pie filling of your choice

Egg wash:
1 large egg

1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Add dough ingredients in the order above to a large bowl and beat until combined.

2. Optional: wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes to firm it up.

3. Grab a large handful of dough and roll out on a well-floured surface to 1/4-inch thickness. Use the rim of a drinking glass to cut circles in the dough, and return the scraps to your dough pile.

4. Place 1 tsp. of filling in the center of each circle. Fold sides over 3 times to form a triangle, and press gently to seal. Do not pinch. Transfer to a baking sheet lined with a silicone baking mat or parchment paper.

5. Repeat with remaining circles and remaining dough. If dough gets too soft, refrigerate it for 15 minutes. When you have formed all the cookies, beat an egg in a small bowl. Use a pastry brush to brush each cookie lightly with the beaten egg.

6. Bake for about 25 minutes, or until golden brown. Transfer to a wire cooling rack and cool completely before serving.

10 comments:

willowbirdbaking said...

Aw, sweet story and lovely cookies!

Linda said...

Yum. Love Hamantaschen.

grace said...

things i would abuse:
1-the pronunciation of these cookies
2-any inanimate object standing in the way of me and these cookies
2-a plateful of these cookies
thanks for your recipe! :)

foodandtales said...

Yay! I was hoping you would post a recipe for Hamantaschen when I heard you guys were making them this week. I think I see what Andy meant by folding. They are quite pretty!

My family makes a cookie that is similar ingredient-wise, but we sandwich the jam between a crumbly cookie crust and a lattice crust on top for the stained glass effect.

I think I'm going to try making these this weekend!

Megan said...

I love these... with the poppy seed filling! I guy I worked with at my old job would bring them in every year. It's probably the only reason I wish I still had that job! Cute that you guys are making this a tradition.

Allie said...

nice work taschy!

Lauren said...

Such pretty cookies! I'm curious about these - they look delicious!

Jana said...

This is an awesome recipe. I made mini ones using a 1.5 inch circle cookie cutter. It made around 88 of them and only took 10-15 min to cook.

My only recommendation for those trying this recipe is to mix the salt and baking powder into the flour BEFORE you add it to the wet ingredients.

Great recipe! Cute Story! Thanks!!

Sharon said...

These look wonderful!! I am making some tomorrow was just going to make Apricot but blueberry sounds great too!!

amerita said...

I'm West Indian (my parents are from Guyana) and we call these... pine tarts. A bit easier on the eyes and ears I guess! We mainly use (of course) pineapple filling and it's deeeeelish. Love them!

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